MTA Paediatric Report 2014-2019 Key Findings

Key Findings
Paediatric major trauma patients made up 5% (n=1382) of the overall major trauma population from 2014 to 2019.
Paediatric major trauma peaks in the first 2 years of life, with more than one-quarter (26%, n=366) of all serious injuries in children occurring in this age group.
Males account for a majority (63%, n=874) of paediatric major trauma cases.
Falls from less than 2 m (termed ‘low falls’), road traffic collisions (RTCs) and burns account for 71% (n=985) of all paediatric major trauma patients.
Non-accidental injury (NAI) was recorded in 5% (n=64) of all paediatric major trauma patients, and accounted for 34% (n=47) of major trauma in children aged under 1 year.
Severe injury (Injury Severity Score (ISS) >15) was seen in 35% (n=488) of paediatric major trauma patients, which is comparable to adult major trauma patients.
Home was recorded as the most common place of injury for paediatric major trauma patients (45%, n=628).
The limbs and head are the most common body regions injured in all paediatric major trauma patients, at 32% each (n=439 and n=440, respectively).
Paediatric major trauma presentations were more common in the afternoon and evening between 2.00pm and 9.00pm.
Paediatric major trauma patients were most commonly admitted during the summer months.
Although the majority of paediatric major trauma patients were brought to hospital by ambulance (55%, n=578), it is notable that 41% (n=431) were brought in by car.
Of the patients brought to hospital by ambulance and/or helicopter, a paramedic or advanced paramedic treated 77% (n=482) of paediatric major trauma patients pre-hospital.
Many injured children were transferred to another hospital for ongoing management (57%, n=994).
Trauma teams received injured children on arrival to hospital in 20% of cases (n=234).
Overall, a low percentage of paediatric major trauma patients were documented as having been pre-alerted (13%, n=150); this can be explained in part by a large percentage of patients arriving by car.
Twenty-seven percent (n=312) of paediatric major trauma patients were documented as having been reviewed by a consultant within 30 minutes of arrival to the emergency department.
The most common type of surgery performed was limb surgery (54%, n=370).
Of the 114 paediatric major trauma patients who required a head computed tomography scan (having head injuries and an initial Glasgow Coma Scale score of <13), 52% (n=59) received it within 1 hour.
The median intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) for paediatric major trauma patients was 1.5 days.
The median hospital LOS was 5 days for all paediatric major trauma patients, and 6 days for patients with an ISS of >15.
There were 57 children (4%) who died during hospital admission due to major trauma.
The most common single mechanism of injury leading to death in paediatric major trauma patients was road trauma (32%, n=18).
Eighty-three percent (n=1147) of paediatric major trauma patients were discharged directly home from hospital.
Only 1% (n=19) paediatric major trauma patients were discharged to rehabilitation.